Got questions ?    Click Here    to submit an enquiry    or   call us on    (03) 9484 1566
Got questions ?    Submit Enquiry    Or Call    (03) 9484 1566
MY AUSTRALIAN VISA.com
Neo Phoenix Pty Ltd
Lawyers & Registered Migration Agents

We are experienced Solicitors and Registered Migration Agents with a proven track record. We offer personalised service with a reasonable fee structure.

Check out our latest client testimonials!

Australian Visa Reform

The Department of Immigration and Border Patrol (DIBP) has been asked to update Australia’s archaic and complicated visa system, with the goal to simplify and edit the visa list from 99 down to ten.

The Australian government has invited members of the public and interested parties and stakeholders to submit their recommendations to the visa system.

Australia is a popular place for people to want to move to, or even travel. Our economic stability, the lifestyle, the distance from political danger spots make it a desired destination. As a result, the Department has been inundated with more visa applications than ever before and it has become apparent that the current system isn’t coping with the volume.

The DIBP’s website has announced, “While our visa system has served the nation well, it needs modernising.”

The current visa technology the DIBP is using is over 30 years old and is apparently time and labor intensive for the staff in the department.

With the world’s changing political and economic landscape, any government must change the way they conduct their immigration duties, and this includes embracing technology and being able to ensure it is updatable and flexible for Australia’s growth.

Right now the process for getting an Australian visa is complicated and even more daunting when a non-English speaker is applying. The time and effort it takes to apply for a visa to enter Australia, even just for a holiday is considered so difficult that many people from overseas are avoiding Australia because of the visa system alone.

A more current technological solution will go some way to support the goal of a simpler system but there are also other factors to consider for the Australian government.

Some of the questions the Department has posed to the public are interesting, including;

• What would a system with approximately 10 visas look like?

• What factors should we consider when simplifying the visa system?

• What should be the key characteristics of a simplified and flexible visa system?

• What distinctions should apply to temporary and permanent visas?

• What requirements should underpin a migrant’s eligibility for permanent residence?

• Should a prospective migrant spend a period of time in Australia before becoming eligible for permanent residence? What factors should be considered?

• What role does the visa system play in ensuring Australia remains attractive to the best and brightest temporary and permanent migrants?

• Do you think an efficient visa system that is simple to understand and quickly assesses risk will make Australia a more attractive destination? Why?

• To what extent should the Government collect biometrics from visa applicants?

These are all valid questions and the answers will be valuable to the department in their approach in reforming the visa system.

By approaching the people who use the system, and asking them their opinion from a users perspective, we have confidence that the new visa reform system will offer the best user experience, will be less stress on the system and staff, and will encourage confidence that Australia has a modern visa application process, which ultimately reflects back on the rest of the nation.


If you would like help with your visa or to talk to someone, then speak to us today.